Residents rally to fight proposed boundary changes

UNITED: Rouse Hill Heights Action Group president Colleen Abela and resident Joe Russo are calling on the community to rally together to fight the proposed suburb changes.
UNITED: Rouse Hill Heights Action Group president Colleen Abela and resident Joe Russo are calling on the community to rally together to fight the proposed suburb changes.

A community group is calling on residents to take a stand against proposed boundary changes. 

Rouse Hill Heights Action Group is urging affected residents to unite after Blacktown Council supported a controversial decision to split the community.

Earlier this month council amended its original proposal to create 11 new suburbs down to eight and expanded the boundaries for Shanes Park, Marsden Park, Vineyard, Schofields, Colebee, Riverstone and Rouse Hill.

The new names include Melonba, Lynch, Angus, Richards, Kwigan, Wran and Grevillea Grove.

Rouse Hill Heights Action Group president Colleen Abela said the group was “stunned” by council’s decision and would be fighting it. 

“We can’t believe Blacktown Council is ignoring the resident’s wishes and history,” Ms Abela said. 

“There is no democracy.”

The community group also holds concerns for the loss of Rouse Hill’s history.

“We are the original Rouse Hill and we don’t want to be slated with a politician [Wran] who has no connection to the area,” Ms Abela said. “We are calling on other community groups to work together.

“We want to keep the history of the area and these names have nothing to do with the area. 

“We are willing to work with council but we are really angry and we want to be listened to.”

At its March 29 meeting, councillors agreed to give people 28 days to express their views, but community feedback saw the exhibition period extended to August 31. 

Council received 6000 submissions during the exhibition period.  But Rouse Hill resident Joe Russo, whose new suburb could be Wran, said he was disappointed by the lack of support from Blacktown councillors. 

“We spoke to about 80 per cent of affected landowners and they were all opposed,” Mr Russo said. “The Geographical Names Board heavily listen to the recommendations of Blacktown Council because they represent us, but in this case, they don’t.”

The revised names and boundaries for the suburbs will now be sent to the Geographical Names Board for review at its next meeting on November 21.