Kellyville Fire and Rescue has a new firie joining the roster

NEW GRADUATE: Kellyville Fire and Rescue newest recruit Josh English tried for more than five years to join the force before he was accepted earlier this year. Picture: Isabella Lettini

NEW GRADUATE: Kellyville Fire and Rescue newest recruit Josh English tried for more than five years to join the force before he was accepted earlier this year. Picture: Isabella Lettini

Kellyville Fire Station’s newest recruit Josh English has jumped from the corporate ladder to the fireman’s ladder.

The former accountant, 25, has traded the calculator for the fire hose and joined the ranks at Kellyville Fire and Rescue.

Mr English graduated from the gruelling 14-week training course at the Fire and Rescue NSW (FRNSW) State Training College at Alexandria last month.

The new recruit said he was “stoked” when he was finally accepted into the state training college. 

“I’ve got a good crew to show me the ropes and that’s what is important,” Mr English said. 

“We’ve done a fair few jobs already. I did my first motor vehicle accident but mostly it has been building checks or automatic alarms.

“For the other blokes in my crew, it’s probably just another day but I still get a kick when the bell goes off.”

The Central Coast resident said the biggest attraction of the job was helping people in need.

“The biggest thing they drilled into us is that we are going to work with people on their worst day and we have the chance to help them or save their lives,” Mr English said. 

“It’s more than putting out fires, it’s accidents, education and training as well.”

Mr English might also be a familiar face for some with his interest in boxing.

He is the reigning Australian Light-Flyweight National Champion and has been named national champion four times.

Minister for Emergency Services Troy Grant said that he was proud that this year’s recruits reflect the diversity and culture we see in society.

“These men and women are joining one of the most professional, skilled and advanced firefighting services in the world,” Mr Grant said.

“They have proven themselves able to meet the challenges of the job, from firefighting and providing advanced first aid, to responding to road‑crashes, fire science and what to do around hazardous materials.

“I thank all the FRNSW firefighters and staff for their professionalism and enormous contribution to our emergency services.

Firefighters are called on to perform vital and sometimes dangerous work, but it is also an extremely rewarding career.” 

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