Habitat homes for native species created in Annangrove Park

New home: The habitat holes have been created from dead trees in Annangrove Park to encourage more native wildlife in the area. Picture: Supplied

New home: The habitat holes have been created from dead trees in Annangrove Park to encourage more native wildlife in the area. Picture: Supplied

These trees may be dead, but they’ll be able to provide life for years to come.

The Hills Council’s Community Environment Centre at Annangrove has created new homes for many native species whose habitats are in The Hills.

Two large dead trees in Annangrove Park have been converted into so-called ‘habitat holes’ as a way to reinvent the trees.

The habitat holes will be able to provide for micro bats, sugar gliders, brush tail possums as well as small possums.

To encourage the species to reside in the trees, bat flats, artificial hollows and bird boxes have also been installed in the trees.

Branch stubs on the trees will also be kept to be used as perches for native birds.

It’s hoped the new habitat holes will encourage greater biodiversity in the area.

The habitat holes will come as good news to environmental advocates, with many campaigning earlier this year against changes to the state’s environmental laws.

The laws would give greater flexibility for developers to clear land in areas around the habitat of threatened of species.

More than 150 threatened species live in the Cumberland Plains Woodlands, with parts stretching into the Rouse Hill area.

The Community Environment Centre is getting ready for its 10th birthday celebrations.

The centre will reach the milestone in July, with  tours and workshops planned.